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Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19 (some duplicates have been removed)
, so as a for instance, we do not have a deal on the debt ceiling yet. we have no idea what sequestration would mean. apple is leading the market. actually gotten killed. all of these things would be told and needed to be in place in order for the market to go up and are not. i think the story here is very low expectations and investors looking at that three-year number, five-year number and saying the market is way more hospitable than i thought it would be and i need to do something different than what i've been doing all this time. >> all right. rick santelli, your take on this day. your landscape is bigger than just equities. treasury yields have been ticking up. currencies are going higher against the dollar and oil is going higher. what do you make of what's going on today? >> well, one thing just said that has a common denominator with all of those, of course, is liquefying and central bank activity whether it's bank of japan, europe, we see interest rates are up. went from 180 to testing 190. the bund violated 160, hasn't done that for a while. europe's growth is cal
center on a talk to talk about options of dealing with the debt ceiling check out c-span studentcam 2013 video documentary competition. the deadline is friday january 28. the grand prize is $5000. >> i welcome all of you here today. on behalf of the gerald ford school of public policy, university of michigan is honored to welcome the honorable ben bernanke, chairman of the board of governors. today's conversation is in a series of distinguished lectures at the school. we are pleased to produce today's events and to have have president mary sue coleman with us. i would like to welcome all of them and thank them for joining us today. it is an honor and truly a personal pleasure for me to introduce our special guest. the charge is to promote a healthy economy and a complex and critically important mission. german ben bernanke was first appointed as the chair in 2006 and he has served in that role during the most challenging time for monetary and financial policy since the great depression. the financial crisis, the great recession, slow recovery with the evolving global challenges and very
. adam: before we get to the debt ceiling. california overestimated how much tax revenue they would get from the facebook ipo. the overestimated by $600 million. you can hear jerry brown doing a homer simpson. can you trust governments to get the numbers right? the fight over the debt ceiling is in full force. as democratdemocrats propose a o eliminate it completely and the ratings have come out with two scenarios in which it was downgraded the u.s. credit rating. not good news. some republicans are relishing the debt ceiling does indeed have to be raised. joining us now, ihs chief economist and we appreciate you being here. is this fight we are about to have necessary, and what is going to happen to whether it is the global market, 401(k), what will happen to all of us if congress passes this fight? >> this is not a necessary fight. this situation created by congress which sent the debt ceilinfrom years ago in hopes it would impose some discipline but of course it hasn't because it has been raised and raised and raised and now it is a source of a contentious debate that is still raised
deals that were contingent upon or in the context of raising the debt ceiling. you, yourself, four times have done that. three times, those were related to deficit reduction or budget maneuvers. what chuck and i and i think many people are curious about is this new, adamant desire on your part not to negotiate, when that seems to conflict with the entire history in the modern era of american presidents and the debt ceiling, and your own history on the debt ceiling. and doesn't that suggest that we are going to go into a default situation because no one is talking to each other about how to resolve this? >> well, no, major, i think if you look at the history, getting votes for the debt ceiling is always difficult, and budgets in this town are always difficult. i went through this just last year. but what's different is we never saw a situation as we saw last year in which certain groups in congress took such an absolutist position that we came within a few days of defaulting. and the fact of the matter is, is that we have never seen the debt ceiling used in this fashion, where the notion
because of scheduling and needing to deal with the debt ceiling and the looming sequester and house republicans concerned that if they do anything on tax reform, that they may leave themselves open to the senate not taking action. therefore, they have taken in on popular vote for no reason. >> first of all we have to solve this debt crisis in terms of sequestration and in terms of the full faith and credit of the u.s. and. we are not going to accomplish tax reform in the next six weeks. so we have a deadline that cannot basically be moved for what we need to do in the next six weeks. so that would leave adequate time to tackle the longer-range problems. we will not publish tax reform in the next six weeks, but we need to essentially deal with the sequester. since we find a balanced approach that is going to raise the trillion dollar surplus to it. that is why i have some optimism. because we need to face up to the next six weeks and solve it and then move on. >> [inaudible question] i'd like to ask you about one of the big things involving entitlement reform. how big of a package wo
there not be crisis after crisis dealing with the debt ceiling. >> you said last night, you've got to put on a yogi bear costume to make sense of it. >> returning a lot to shareholders. >> one wonders. >> $12 million they're talking about. >> they have been increasing, of course, ever since the huge cuts that had to take place. what is it going to be now, four years ago, right? >> that period, $6. >> yeah. >> march of '09. amazing, coming up on the four-year anniversary. >> do you ever worry about your paycheck? >> yeah. i think you worry about money you had in any bank account or anything. sure. ge was to cushifocused in the ff '08, that was the moment where it could all come to -- >> that was after the ge bailout. >> sorry, not to revisit the -- >> we have to remind people where we came from. tim geithner leaving, david faber is worried about his paycheck. >> speaking of paychecks, let's talk morgan stanley. wall street firm reporting fourth quarter earnings 45 earlier on squawk, james gorman said his firm is poised to improved market environment. which shows a lot of promise if uncertainty is re
in congress to secure a innovative deal and help to close the 2011 deal lifted the debt ceiling. and most recently the vice president has been leading the way in the president's push for workable gun safety policies. on thursday, biden spoke for almost an hour at the meeting of the u.s. conference of marz and acknowledged that the white house is likely okay come under criticism for many of its gun proposals. >> we'll take this fight to the hauls of congress and take it beyond that. we're going to take it to the american people. we're going to go around the country and make our case and we're going to let their voices, the voice of the american people be heard and we'll be criticized because people say if we spend that much energy we're not spending enough energy on umm grags. we're not spending enough 234r7b8g on the miss energy on the miss kwal problem -- on the fiscal problem. presidents don't get to choose what they do. they deal with what is before them and what they'd like to long term. >> governor, i'm curious to get your thoughts on the package of reforms. it was interesting that t
the way. we've got a debt ceiling issue that the president's going to have to deal with. there are a lot of other issues the president's going to have to deal with, immigration reform. i think the president's going to have to spend time on this whether he wants to or not. >> connie mack, nice to see you. >> nice to see you. >> please tell your lovely wife we're sorry she lost all her luggage and was stuck at the airport. >> love you, honey. >> we'll get back to john berman with a look at some of the other stories ahead this morning. >>> we'll be talking about the golden globes. ben affleck didn't get nominated for an oscar, but his surprise win at the globes may be vindication. we'll have that, the other surprises, and the big snubs in a live report. >>> he's known for his role on "breaking bad," but actor steven michael casada has a new role to play, local school board member. you should know that axiron is here. the only underarm treatment for low t. that's right, the one you apply to the underarm. axiron is not for use in women or anyone younger than 18. axiron can transfer to others
and the time we deal with the debt ceiling and we may meet the goal which we set out to do, which is to have roughly a $4 trillion cut over 10 years in the long-term deficit and to put us on that path. but i didn't come here to talk about any of those important subjects today, because as important as they all are today we have a more urgent and immediate call and that is how to deal with the epidemic of gun violence in america. you all know the statistics better than anyone so i'm not going to repeat them. on that score, i owe an incredible debt of gratitude to you at the head table and those of you in the room. unanimitydon't have in this ballroom nor do we in any ballroom, but we all acknowledge that we have to do something. we have to act. and i hope we all agree, there is a need to respond to the carnage on our streets and in our schools. i hope we all agree that mass shootings like the one we witnessed in newtown 34 days ago cannot be continued to be tolerated. that tragedy has affected the public psyche in a way i have never seen before. the image of first graders, not only shot, but r
problem we need to deal with, martha, the misuse of the term default that emerged in the last debt ceiling crisis in august of 2011 when used on both sides of the aisle, when we reach the point the united states didn't have anymore borrowing authority that automatically meant default. it doesn't. that was a false definition then. it is a false definition now. we have enough money to operate essential components of this government that we can go on for a very long time. this isn't a crisis that hits a deadline that turns it into default. furthermore the economy of the united states, if we continue on this trillion dollar plus a year increase in our national debt does eventually hit a place of insolvency. that is what i fear. that is what most conservatives fear, martha. martha: but the president is basically saying to you, and the rest of the republicans in the house, that he is going to raise the debt limit. that the debt limit is going up. there won't be any negotiations over spending cuts that might offset that increase. there is going to be no negotiation. so what will you do? >> first
but with the folks back home, that we can actually deal with these things, take the small one first, debt ceiling last, i think it's a rational, reasonable thing to do. >> now, for some, wolf, maybe even those in the republican house leadership, like him talking about what is rational and reasonable, that may be a bit jarring but the house republicans are coming out of their three-day retreat saying they have a better chance of reaching their goal of broad spending cuts. and that means not making the demand in the next few weeks, which is exactly what it would mean because, according to most economists, we will hit that debt ceiling mid-february. >> so here's the question, bottom line, is is this a sure thing? will congress actually vote to raise the debt limit next week? >> well, there is a catch. the house gop, the leadership at least says what they are going to try to pass next week would raise the debt ceiling for three months but with a condition. and that would be that the house and senate pass budgets. it may seem simple but house republicans like to point out that they haven't passed a bu
ceiling bill that was undermined from the beginning, no deal was reached, sequestration, massive cuts to our national security, our national defense. would be inflicted. and massive cuts to medicare. our leaders responded to me that , gee, the democrats will never allow the cuts to medicare, the sequestration to medicare, $300 billion or so, they'll never allow that. that's why we know the supercommittee will reach an agreement. i advised them that that would not happen. there would be no agreement. of course they're willing to have $300 billion or so cut to medicare because obamacare cut $00 billion from medicare, from our seniors' care, without a single republican vote. so the only way the democrats could run a commercial last year, 2012 with any sincerity at all saying, gee, republicans are cutting medicare, would be if they prevent republicans from reaching agreement with the president, democrats, and then they'll run in in commercials in 2012 and blame republicans and say, see, they didn't reach an agreement. they wanted to cut seniors and help their rich friends. as some of us m
congress to up the debt ceiling. of course what he said is, i know the republicans want to try to get some sort of spending cuts and stuff like that. i'll deal with it. just not over this. >>gretchen: so yesterday how has he changed now that he's president and he's been in a couple of these debt ceiling fights with republicans? another one is coming up in march. many people believe it is the only leverage the republicans hold in any kind of discussions about cutting spending. the president changing his tune now. listen to this. >> america cannot afford another debate with this congress about whether or not they should pay the bills they've already racked up. so to even entertain the idea of this happening, of the united states of america not paying its bills, is irresponsible. it's absurd. >>steve: so it was irresponsible for president bush to run up a huge bill. and now that he's president, it's irresponsible if the congress doesn't give him the blank check. let's just point out a couple of things. president bush all by his lonesome racked up about $5 trillion in debt. in eight years. pre
the negotiations should take place? should be the debt ceiling or the continuing resolution to fund the government or sequestration? caller: the continuing revolution to keep the government going -- resolution. there are many departments we don't need. i was showing my grandchildr the debt clock, telling him how much money he would know when he becomes a taxpayer. he said he does not want to become a taxpayer. this is taxation without representation. they have to get this under control. they need a dyiet. host: jason is a democratic caller in brooklyn, new york. caller: i think the debt is negotiable. it has been high before. host: what did you say? caller: it ought to be negotiable. i think obama needs to the finish his job. spending programs for poor neighborhoods and give other people a chance in this country. the tea party and right-wing republicans, it is obvious they are racist and nobody wants to work with them. in the next four years they have to get it right, because asians, hispanics, and african-americans make up the majority of this country now. so they had better get it right. host: t
republicans argue, this is an action forcing event. the debt ceiling increase is remind forea generation that the u.s. must tackle its debt and deficit problems. that is why there must be spending decreases, something they say wasn't a part of the deal the president just signed to avert, at least some of the fiscal cliff. tracy: here we go again. if february 15th is the big day, that would mean your poor wife will probably be alone on valentine's day, rich edson. god bless you. >> there are worse things. tracy: buy her a box of chocolate. >>> with earnings season getting in full swing this week our next guest says results could provide a base for the market to move higher especially because expectations are so darn low. joining us, margie battle, wells fargo advantage funds senior portfolio manager. earnings are low but doesn't bode well for what we'll hear out of these companies, does it? >> well i think some companies have done some preannouncements where they're expecting their growth to slow down because we should have some pretty low gdp growth for the next several months because of
Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19 (some duplicates have been removed)